activism

Exploring the role of librarianship in activism.

I'm crossing off Days 2 and 4 at once by reading this series today. It's the International Queer Art and Activism Zine: Exploring the intersections of art and activism.

Even though it's the weekend, we're still profiling zines in preparation for our Make-A-Zine Event this Wednesday! Here's number 4, "What I Saw from Where I Stood."

Hey there! Check out this great new project that I (Jordan) have been working on recently: As[I]Am is a soon-to-be-launched Asian American social justice website showcasing the work of artists and activists across the US. We have a Facebook page with our mission statement and a call for submissions out. Our first deadline is March 2nd for submissions to be featured with the launch! Digital zines are gladly accepted. Additionally, any zinesters that want to participate in email interviews for As[I]Am, shoot us an email! Please send submissions and other notes to asiamproject@gmail.com – more info and submission guidelines after the jump.

There's a Feminist Zine Reading at Bluestockings featuring our zine assistant Jordan Alam and our libary school intern Elvis Bakaitis! Both are prolific and excellent zinesters. Click for more for info and check out the Facebook Event.

The Flyaway Zine Mobile is headed to Madison, Wisconsin this weekend! You can browse the Zine Mobile's collection, participate in an open zine-reading event, and take part in Protest Karaoke! More info on the Zine Mobile's website!

An instructor in the Young Women's Leadership Initiative program asked me to pull zines with these guidelines:

I think it's less important to show range--since they will be making pretty traditional format zines--and more important just to show strong examples with good layout and intelligent writing. The more "issue"-oriented the better, since I'm going to be focusing on the idea of making political zines as opposed to purely personal or diaristic ones.

The collective mobile zine project Cross Pollinate is looking for your participation in their show and tell zine tour. The central mission of Cross Pollinate is to create spaces and communities across the country for people to exchange wisdom, skills, ideas, and art. Participation in this tour may entail traveling in the zine mobile, contributing to Cross Pollinate's project at their local stops, organizing local events, and hosting tourmates in your home.  Though their exact route is not explicity planned, they shall venture out from California in the last week of June, head up through the West Coast, then eventually land in Nebraska in early August. They are still open for potential destinations, hosts, and organizers across the country. Cross Pollinate is especially interested in bringing their project to marginialized areas such as international communities, land projects, small towns and rural areas, and wheel-chair accessible venues.

To find out more information:  http://zinemobile.wordpress.com/

To get in touch with the organizers of the tour email: zinemobile@gmail.com

50 Shades of Grey, the bestselling book that you caught your mother reading in the bathtub, tells of a post-grad, virginal woman's experience as a submissive in  a BDSM sexual relationship. Despite her initial hesitation and isolation, she ultimately engages in her subordinate role, desirous of the painful pleasure that he concedes her.

Explicitly erotic and yet wildly popular, 50 Shades of Grey apparently taps into a specific sexual "fantasy" of many women: a lust for submission.

Well, pardon me, but I couldn't imagine a "fantasy" that seems to mirror female reality much more accurately.  Is author  EL James perhaps implying that women, even behind closed doors, would rather be in a poisiton of subordinance? Does she reinforce pornographic standards that women must find their own loss of control appealing? Is it wrong to find this sexual dynamic appealing? Are we reading too much into this, and  do I have to keep imagining my mom in  a bubble bath?

Make your voice heard about the book noone will stop talking about on Thursday, June 26th from 7-9 at Revolution Books 146 West 26th Street, Manhattan

212-691-3345 
(btw 6th & 7th Avenues, #1 to 28th St.). The discussion will be hosted by Sunsara Taylor and the Project to End Pornography and Patriarchy: The Enslavement and Degradation of Women. 
For more information, contact stoppatriarchy@gmail.com .

The Madison InfoShop, a radical resource center in Madison, WI, is launching a digital zine library and oral history project. Get a summary and volunteer info.

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