new zines


I acquired some loverly new zines at the exhilarating Feminism and Zines event organized by librarian-artist-activist Jude Vachon at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh


I have finished cataloging the backlog of all zines purchased for or donated to the Barnard Library Zine Collection from the time we began collecting zines in 2003 (or 2004?) through when I stopped opening new donation packages late last summer!

Just now in the thick of processing a box of donations from the presumably wonderful Sarah Rose, of Tazewell’s Favorite Eccentric and other zines. Let me be the first to tell you: this box is full of gems. We now finally have stacks copies (hell yes that means they’ll circulate) of a bunch of stuff, and archival copies of way, way more, including an issue of Girl Germs I have never even seen before (and I am getting on in years). I’ll post updates to the archives as they’re processed, but for now, check out what’s new to the stacks:

Wallflower started out as a Geocities webzine, whatever "webzine" meant to the author, Kristina Aikens, in 1997. Check out the Wayback Machine's capture of Kristina's site. Ah, youth (the World Wide Web's, that is)!

From Stealing Your Education at Columbia: a User's Guide to Getting a Free Education in New York City:

Some people will say, however, that universities are actually packed with radical professors spouting revolutionary new ideas. Granted, there are some smart professors with interesting things to say, and it’s worth your time to get whatever useful information you can out of them (which is why this pamphlet exists.) But don’t be fooled by these so-called "radical" academics. If they’re so radical, why do they spend all of their time writing books and sitting in their offices? Writing and reading and sitting around should support radical activity, not substitute for it. "Radical" professors, like all professors, are just intellectual bureaucrats without the courage to pursue a radical course of action, no matter what their ideas may be. Like all professionals, they’ve sacrificed their humanness for the supposed perks (more like curses) of a middle-class life. Approach them with caution.


Saturday, March 12th, 2011, 8pm
Death by Audio
49 S. 2nd Street, b/w Kent & Wythe
Brooklyn, NY 11211
 

Hey there! It's time for the abstracting report - this week we have a plethora of perzines and political zines for your perusal.


  • Let's Talk About Consent, Baby by Honor |

  • Listen to Me Whine #6 by Michelle |

  • Lite by Nadia Yaron |

  • Living Doll Disaster by Jennifer Whiteford |

  • Lollygag by Deanna Lehman |

  • Lost Star Found by Mary Fraser |

  • Loud As Hell by Anne and Jenna |

  • Loudmouth! by Claire Sewell |

  • Love Bubbles by Ellisa Goldberg |

  • Love Letter by Thara Harris |

  • Love Letters to Monsters #3/Alabama Girl #9 (split zine) by Ciara Xyerra and Aleicia Ruscin |

  • Love Like Pop by Rachael Kuan |

  • Lovelace |

  • Lovely Ugly Cruel World: The Halloween Episode by Amanda Rehagen |

  • Lovesongs by Laura Nicole Faulds |

  • Mind Maps by Robin Sarah Cameron |

  • Mindfill #1 by Kisah Feder |

  • Minimum Rock n Roll by Allison |

  • Mischa by Natascha |

  • Miss Mary Mack #4, #5 by Marina Vishmidt |

  • Miss Sequential #3, S.F. 2009 by Marissa Falco |

  • Mistake by Sarah Gion |

  • More Signs You Do A Zine by Davida Gypsy Breier |

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